How the Internet of Things could help us feed the world sustainably

BLOG: Heidelberg Laureate Forum

Laureates of mathematics and computer science meet the next generation
Heidelberg Laureate Forum

According to UN projections, the world could have 10 billion people by 2050, and feeding everyone will not be an easy task. At the same time, environmental problems like water scarcity or soil erosion put even more pressure on already strained agricultural systems. To top it all off, the threat of climate heating also looms above the entire planet.

But help is on its way, though not in the form you might expect it. It’s not bigger tractors or sharper plows — it’s cheap sensors and big data.

A solar-powered wireless sensor network at the CSIRO ICT Centre in Brisbane, Australia, offering information about temperature, soil moisture, water quality, humidity and solar energy levels. Image credits: CSIRO.

Agriculture 3.0

The moment when humans first settled down and started using tools and animals to plow the fields can probably be considered the start of agriculture. Plows improved and practices developed, but for thousands of years, agriculture still relied on human and animal labor. Then, the Industrial Revolution ushered a major transformation by bringing machines into the scene, and a new age began for agriculture.

But humans didn’t have to wait thousands for the next revolution. The new age of agriculture, what many are starting to call “Agriculture 3.0” (or smart farming, or precision agriculture) is already within grasp.

It involves using sensors to monitor plant and soil parameters, monitoring and navigating crop sites using remote sensing data and ground positioning systems, and coordinating using modern communication protocols. Farmers can quickly respond to changes in weather, monitor crops, and only deploy as much water and fertilizer as needed — often by simply using a smartphone.

“This could be a game-changer for agriculture all around the world, especially for small farms. It’s not just about the yield, you can reduce the amount of water and fertilizer you use so it’s more sustainable and more productive,” says Alexandra Gerea, who’s PhD work revolves around geophysical sensors for agriculture. “The sensors are becoming cheaper every year, and many of them are open-source, which makes it even better.”

A joint humidity/temperature sensor like this can go for a few Euro. Image via Wiki Commons.

Gerea’s work at the University of Birmingham, UK focuses on the geophysical imaging of the root area of agricultural plants, gaining insights regarding soil-root interactions. Her ideas would find an echo in much of the world. Around 80% of the global food supply comes from small farms, and these small farms are often the most vulnerable. These 500 million small and family farms constitute over 98% of all farms, the backbone of supply chains in much of the world, yet they often battle poverty or environmental degradation.

Farmers spend a big chunk keeping an eye on the weather, checking on the crops’ condition, fertilizing, and so on. It’s hard work and time-consuming. There’s also a lot of inefficiency in regards to water pumps and fertilization. An Internet of Things (IoT) approach could save time and resources for farmers, making practices more effective and sustainable.

Many of the tools in IoT agriculture are not a novelty, but this is where the “cheaper every year” part comes in. Most small-scale farms operate in low-resource settings, and implementing sensors or GPS receivers was simply not affordable. But thanks to recent developments, technology has become more affordable than ever. The fact that some solutions are open-source also makes them adaptable, which is significant for the highly variable conditions you encounter in farms around the world.

“You can monitor anything: water absorption, fertilizer use, wind, etc” adds Gerea. “You can direct tractors and workers where they are needed, you even have satellite imagery you can access for free. All this can help both farmers and the environment.”

The fact that complementary technology (like smartphones or the internet) have become cheaper and more readily available also favors the expansion of these practices. Already, IoT agriculture is cost-effective in many parts of the world, with similar solutions being deployed to track farm animals in Nigeria. The cost barriers can still be substantial (and in some cases, prohibitive), but nonetheless, these barriers are being reduced year after year.

Example of remote sensing data for agriculture. Image via Wiki Commons..

Urban farming, coming to a town near you

It’s not just rural agriculture, IoT could also pave the way for a new type of farm: the urban, “smart” farm.

“With the pandemic and all that’s happened, I think many people are seeing the appeal of a small garden. But the other thing that’s really exciting is urban farming. You can control the environment perfectly and grow organic, food right at people’s doorsteps, without the need to transport food over great lengths.”

Urban farming is an idea that has picked up tremendously in recent years. It technically refers to all types of urban farming (which can feed a surprisingly large number of people), but increasingly, one type of farm is drawing people’s attention: vertical farms.

Vertical farms often don’t use soil at all. They use a controlled environment that optimizes plant growth using hydroponics, aquaponics, and sometimes even aeroponics to grow plants. The greatly reduces one of agriculture’s main problems: the need for a large area. Agriculture normally takes up a lot of space, which often leads to deforestation, ecosystem degradation, soil erosion, and so on. But if you grow crops vertically in stacked layers, you can feed as many as 50,000 people within the surface of a skyscraper.

The main problem with vertical farming is its energy use. Vertical farms are grown indoor, so they need a source of light — and even with efficient LEDs, electricity can be costly and polluting. But if a country has access to cheap, clean energy, then vertical farms become much more appealing. Using sensors and cleverly designed systems, the entire system can operate much more efficiently than conventional farms, regardless of the local climate. This makes it a desirable proposition for countries like Denmark, which just opened a giant vertical farm, powered entirely by wind. The plant completely reuses all its water, has no soil, and when fully operational, can produce up to 1,000 tons of food per year in a previously abandoned warehouse.

Smart agriculture isn’t just a good idea — it’s a necessity

Current agricultural trends are unsustainable — there’s no way to sugar coat it. It’s causing land and water resources to degrade, and as the population is expected to grow over the next few decades, we simply have to do better (and also have to find ways to feed the over 800 million people that go hungry). Smart agriculture and IoT systems will almost certainly play a vital role in the transition to sustainable agriculture.

From rural family farms to large agricultural corporations and urban vertical farms, IoT has a lot to offer. This unlikely pair between IoT and agriculture, between the old and the new, promises increased efficiency, better yields, and more sustainability. Whether it’s cheap sensors, satellite data, self-driving tractors or drones, it can help in all geographic areas and all types of farms. As energy and technology become cheaper, we will undoubtedly be seeing this technology more and more.

Posted by

Andrei is a science communicator and a PhD candidate in geophysics. He is the co-founder of ZME Science, where he published over 2,000 articles. Andrei tries to blend two things he loves (science and good stories) to make the world a better place -- one article at a time.

13 comments

  1. Managing your field with IoT, drones, precision seeding, plowing, harvesting or doing urban agriculture with hydroponics and aquaponics will converge in automated agriculture, which means that manual interventions in agriculture will be negligible in the future.

    Such agriculture can also be more sustainable because resources are better utilized and the flow of nutrients/fertilizers can be tracked, avoiding pollution of runoff waters.

    But more automation will also reduce small-scale/subsistence farming because highly automated farming requires that you can buy the necessary IoT, drones, etc., and that is only possible if you have the money when you sell the goods you produce.

    A true subsistence farmer produces only for himself and his family and therefore has no money. The fact that 80% of the food produced comes from small-scale farming only means that 80% of the farmers are very poor. In developed countries like Germany, small-scale agriculture is almost non-existent: the number of farms decreased from 900,000 in 1975 to only 270,000 in 2019, but the amount of food produced still increased.

    The exact same thing will happen in Nigeria, and it is already happening. It has to happen because Nigeria will have twice as many people in 2050 as it does today and could have 900 million people in 2100, which means Nigeria will have only slightly fewer people than India in 2100 and will have the second largest population in the world in 2100. With a population density comparable to that of Bangladesh, and with more than 80% living in cities (up from 50% today), Nigeria will need to rely on greatly intensified agriculture in 2100.

    And yes, Nigeria will likely rely on urban agriculture in 2100 as well.

  2. Is that “sustainable” when an ever greater flood of people robs more and more wild animals of their habitat ??? Our species already has far too many specimens; it behaves like a cancerous tumor that is crushing the planet beneath it.

  3. Neulich sah ich eine Doku, wo westafrikanische Farmer mit der Smartphone-Technologie zu besseren/höheren Erntemengen verholfen werden solle.
    Tage später gabs eine Meldung oder eine Thematik, bei der es um indische Bauern ging, die massenweise demonstrierten, weil ihnen ihre Grundlage des Lebens (und Farmens) durch irgendwelche Veränderungen im Gesetz erschwehrt wurde und ein Detail davon war, das mit moderner Technologie Kontrolle ausgeübt wird, die alte Anbaumethoden ersetzt (und Lebensweisen beeinflusst – wenn auch nur durch strukturelle Mechanismen).

    Und dann kam mir dieser Beitrag in die Aboliste:

    22:17
    Läuft gerade
    How a geospatial nervous system could help us design a better future | Jack Dangermond
    TED
    30.980 Aufrufe vor 3 Tagen

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXm4gx0EdlU

    Der Titel spricht gar von geospartialen Nervensystemen. Von flächendeckenden Vernetzungsstrukturen, die jederzeit beliebig wählbare Informationen bereitstellen kann.

    Und nun dieser Beitrag Oben, bei dem es im Dunstkreis der Landauer Szene wiederum um die Vernetzung und Kontrollfunktion der Welt geht.

    Und alles natürlich aus gutem Grund und gutem Ideal: die Verbesserung der landwirtschaftlichen Erträge…wegen der Ernährung der Weltbevölkerung und so. Wogegen man in der Betrachtung nichts einwenden kann. Eine inherente Immunisierung gegen Kritik, die ja gegen die Nöte hungernder Menschen wie ein Strohmann aussieht und sich ignorant darstellt, als würde man mit hungernden Menschen nicht mitleiden (obwohl das satten Menschen natürlich nur unter extremen kognitiven Verrenkungen möglich ist – satt sein ist ein Zustand, der vollkommen passiv und unkreativ und unsensibel macht).

    Das man mit solchen “geospartial”-Systemen praktisch lückenlose Kontrolle nicht nur über Anbau-Zyklen und Methoden erreichen kann, sondern auch Menschen jederzeit beobachten und kontrollieren kann, ist niemandem ein Zweifel wert. Wo doch “Kontrolle” eh besser sei, als Vertrauen….und die moderne Technologie diese alten Träume von lückenloser Kontrolle tatsächlich verwirklichen kann.

    Und… dann gäbe es da noch das Szenario, wobei diese Mikrowellenstrahlung dann sehr manipulierend wirkt, wenn Menschen zu viele Metalle in ihren Körpern und Gehirnen haben, weil diese Metalle dann eine erhöhte Zellpotetniale erzeugen, die wiederum elektrische Felder erzeugen, die durch Mikrowellenstrahlung beeinflusst…also manipuliert werden können, was wiederum in die Zelle zurückwirkt und…mit Sicherheit Nachteile haben wird. Bis hin zum Problem, das aus elektrisch überlasteten Zellen Krebs oder Zelltod/Zellzerstörung entstehen kann.

    Wenn das wahr ist, das Mikrowellen derart und unter solchen Umständen Wirkungen auf Menschen haben kann, dann hat man damit eine vollkommen neue und vollkommen flächendeckende “Waffe”, und Manipulationsmöglichkeit, um Menschen in einen Kontrollzustand zu versetzen, um sie ultimativ “unfrei” zu machen. Und zwar fast flächendeckend. Und wenn man die Pläne hinsichtlich 5G so hört, ist “Flöächendeckend” hierbei wirklich, wie der Begriff es aussagt, nicht, wie man heute zuweilen über Funklöcher klagt, die die wenigsten wirklich noch kennen.

    • @Andromed: Sie sehen in der Erdbeobachtung, den Sensoren einer automatisierten Landwirtschaft und im neuesten Mobilfunkstandard 5G lauter Technologien zur Menschenüberwachung und zur Gedankenkontrolle.
      Über Erdinformationssysteme schreiben sie: „ auch Menschen jederzeit beobachten und kontrollieren kann,“
      Über smarte Landwirtschaft: „ Und nun dieser Beitrag Oben, bei dem es im Dunstkreis der Landauer Szene wiederum um die Vernetzung und Kontrollfunktion der Welt geht.“
      Über 5G: „ flächendeckende “Waffe”, und Manipulationsmöglichkeit“

      Letzte Frage:Danke für die Benachrichtigung, dass Erdinformationssysteme, intelligente Landwirtschaft und 5G alle der Kontrolle und Überwachung von Menschen dienen.

      Jetzt will ich nur noch wissen: Wer steckt dahinter, wer will uns alle überwachen und kontrollieren? Sind Sie es?
      Besten Dank im Voraus für die Beantwortung dieser Frage.

      • Herr Holzherr, sie waren noch nie lustig. Deswegen sollten sie auch nicht versuchen.

        Funknetze sind dazu geeignet, neuronal erzeugte Felder zu detektieren. Im Zweifel ist das lebende Gehirn nur ein Störfunksignal, so, wie der Mensch den Radiofunk stören kann, wenn er in die Nähe der Antenne geht.

        An der Charakteristik des Störsignals kann man Menschen relativ eindeuitig identifizieren.

        Aber sie würden jetzt einwenden, das die Technologie so sensibel gar nicht sei, um die Unterschiede zwischen Menschen zu messen…richtig?

        • Zitat Andromed: Funknetze sind dazu geeignet, neuronal erzeugte Felder zu detektieren.
          Verstehe ich sie richtig, dass 5G unsere Hirnaktivität ausspähen kann?

          • Ich lege mich nicht auf 5G fest. Aber Funkanlagen mit flächendeckender Ausleuchtung können heute mit Sicherheit so sensibel sein, das man Störfelder/Signale durchaus viel effektiver Analysieren kann, als es vor 50 jahren noch der Fall war.

            Vorraussetzung ist ein hinreichend stabiles Feld/Signal. Und menschliche Zellpotenziale mögen im Zweifelsfall genau das erzeugen können.

          • @ Martin Holzherr
            27.02.2021, 07:00 o’clock

            Und? Keine Erwiderung?

            Haben sie überhaupt weitergedacht, was das alles bedeuten kann?
            Die “elektronische Fußfessel” wäre damit durch die Mobilfunk-Infrastruktur ermöglicht, und nicht mit einem Fußband mit Sender.

            Aussserdem sind nicht nur Identifizierungen möglich, sondern auch neurologische Manipulationen, die ins Bewusstsein hineinwirken können – etwa indem sie neuronale Reizungen erzeugen, die dann etwa Angstzustände bewirken.

            Bedingung ist dabei aber ein (erhöhtes) Metallenhancemend des Gehirns, das die Funksignale auch wirksam ins Nervensystem überträgt.

            Jedenfalls ist es eine unzulässige Manipulation und Verletzung der körperlichen Unversehrtheit. Allerdings tut kein Arzt irgendetwas dahingehend diagnostizieren (was auch nicht einfach ist, weil man das Gehirn nicht einfach so Biopsierenkann am lebenden Menschen – allerdings gäbe es ja andere Methoden, um solche Angriffe/Manipulationen wenigstens feststellen zu können).

            Wie lebt es sich so in einem Staat, der die Freiheit der “Bürger” und die “öffentliche Ordnung” durch die Erzeugung von psychischen Krankheiten/Extremzustände bei “desintegrierten Delinquenten” herbeiführt?

            Haben sie kein schlechtes Gewissen?

  4. Agricultural practices that lead to soil erosion and degradation are more common in developing countries, for example through overgrazing or slash-and-burn techniques. Sub-Saharan Africa is the most affected. Unfortunately, sub-Saharan Africa also has a rapidly growing population. Any form of “smarter” farming could improve the situation, but (quote) “An Internet of Things (IoT) approach” for these farmers does not seem very realistic to me, as these farmers are far away from technology and also too poor to afford the latest technologies.

    Precision agriculture, smart farming, and automated farming may be the future, but not necessarily the near future for sub-Saharan Africa. But smart and even automated farming has the potential for less expensive food, which could help most people in sub-Saharan Africa, where food imports are already steadily increasing and the combination of 1) a growing population and 2) a decline in yields due to climate change will increase the need for food imports in the near future.

  5. Agricultural practices that lead to soil erosion and degradation are more common in developing countries, for example through overgrazing or slash-and-burn techniques. Sub-Saharan Africa is the most affected. Unfortunately, sub-Saharan Africa also has a rapidly growing population. Any form of “smarter” farming could improve the situation, but (quote) “An Internet of Things (IoT) approach” for these farmers does not seem very realistic to me, as these farmers are far away from technology and also too poor to afford the latest technologies.

    Precision agriculture, smart farming, and automated farming may be the future, but not necessarily the near future for sub-Saharan Africa. But smart and even automated farming has the potential for less expensive food, which could help most people in sub-Saharan Africa, where food imports are already steadily increasing and the combination of 1) a growing population and 2) a decline in yields due to climate change will increase the need for food imports in the near future.

  6. @ Martin Holzherr
    27.02.2021, 07:00 o’clock

    Und? Keine Erwiderung?

    Haben sie überhaupt weitergedacht, was das alles bedeuten kann?
    Die “elektronische Fußfessel” wäre damit durch die Mobilfunk-Infrastruktur ermöglicht, und nicht mit einem Fußband mit Sender.

    Aussserdem sind nicht nur Identifizierungen möglich, sondern auch neurologische Manipulationen, die ins Bewusstsein hineinwirken können – etwa indem sie neuronale Reizungen erzeugen, die dann etwa Angstzustände bewirken.

    Bedingung ist dabei aber ein (erhöhtes) Metallenhancemend des Gehirns, das die Funksignale auch wirksam ins Nervensystem überträgt.

    Jedenfalls ist es eine unzulässige Manipulation und Verletzung der körperlichen Unversehrtheit. Allerdings tut kein Arzt irgendetwas dahingehend diagnostizieren (was auch nicht einfach ist, weil man das Gehirn nicht einfach so Biopsierenkann am lebenden Menschen – allerdings gäbe es ja andere Methoden, um solche Angriffe/Manipulationen wenigstens feststellen zu können).

    Wie lebt es sich so in einem Staat, der die Freiheit der “Bürger” und die “öffentliche Ordnung” durch die Erzeugung von psychischen Krankheiten/Extremzustände bei “desintegrierten Delinquenten” herbeiführt?

    Haben sie kein schlechtes Gewissen?

  7. Zitat Andromed: “ Aussserdem sind nicht nur Identifizierungen möglich, sondern auch neurologische Manipulationen, die ins Bewusstsein hineinwirken können – etwa indem sie neuronale Reizungen erzeugen, die dann etwa Angstzustände bewirken.“
    Ich kenne keine einzige Forschungsstudie, die über so etwas wie (Zitat) neurologische Manipulationen durch 5G berichtet.
    Also entspringt das, was sie hier schreiben, einfach ihrer Phantasie.

  8. @ Martin Holzherr
    11.03.2021, 08:42 o’clock

    Super… für dich ist die Welt nur, was in Studien steht. Etwa so, wie damals alles in der Bibel stand, was man wissen musste, hä?

Leave a Reply


E-Mail-Benachrichtigung bei weiteren Kommentaren.
-- Auch möglich: Abo ohne Kommentar. +