Candle puzzles – solutions

Here are the solutions to the eight candle puzzles we posted earlier.

  • The candles cost €1.05, and the matches cost €0.05.
  • Every 30 seconds the number of people whose candles are lit doubles, starting with 1 person at time 0. After 30 seconds, 2 = 21 candles are lit, after 60 seconds 4 = 22 candles are lit, and so on. After 7 30-second gaps, 27 = 128 candles will be burning, so it will take until 8 lots of 30 seconds (4 minutes) have passed for all the candles to be lit.
  • This can be achieved by lighting one of the candles at both ends, and allowing it to burn from both ends at the same time – the flames will meet in the middle after 30 minutes, at which point you can light the second candle and let it burn for an hour. (This does assume that the candles burn at the same rate regardless of which way up they are – in reality, if a candle was held upright and lit at both ends, the bottom end would burn more quickly. If you hold the candle horizontally it might also burn at a different rate than it burns from the top if held upright. But it’s a nice puzzle!)
  • If you place three of the candles on each side of the scale, this will indicate which group of three the heavy candle is in: if the scale tips one way or the other, it’s in that group of three, and if it balances exactly, it’s in the three candles you didn’t use for this weighing. Take the group of three that the heavy candle is in, and place one candle on each side of the scale – then the same principle will apply to tell you which is the heavy one.
  • After burning 100 candles you’ll have 10 candles’ worth of extra wax; this lets you make 10 more candles, each of which will yield another 1/10 of a candle of wax – so you could make 11 extra candles in total.
  • If you blow on each candle once, starting with the one nearest to you and going round one at a time, when you get back to the start you’ll have blown out all the candles! This is because they each get blown on three times (three candles change from lit to unlit or vice versa on each blow), which is an odd number of times, so they’ll go from lit to unlit eventually.
  • The number of candles you will have blown out is the sum of all the ages you’ve been – when you’re five you’ll have blown ou 1+2+3+4+5 = 15 candles. These are triangular numbers, and the general pattern is N×(N+1) / 2.
  • If you have five 1s and five 0s, the first time you’ll hit a problem is when you need six of the same digit – which will happen for the first time when you try to write the number 111111 = 1+2+4+8+16+32 = 63.

Katie Steckles

Posted by

is a mathematician based in Manchester, who gives talks and workshops on different areas of maths. She finished her PhD in 2011, and since then has talked about maths in schools, at science festivals, on BBC radio, at music festivals, as part of theatre shows and on the internet. Katie writes blog posts and editorials for The Aperiodical, a semi-regular maths news site.

4 comments

  1. Katie Steckles wrote (17. Dec 2019):
    > Candle puzzles – solutions […]
    > • If you blow on each candle once, […] they each get blown on three times (three candles change from lit to unlit or vice versa on each blow), which is an odd number of times, so they’ll go from lit to unlit eventually.

    This in itself is of course correct. And of course it doesn’t matter in which specific sequence the blows are issued to the specific trick candles; decisive is only that as many distinctly directed blows are issued as there are candles on the cake (i.e. 7, in the problem stated on 10. Dec 2019). However, the actual problem statement was:

    […] How can you blow out all the candles using the fewest breaths?


    Therefore:
    Please proove that 7 blows is indeed the fewest number of blows to turn off all 7 trick candles on the cake, subject to the stated rule (“Whichever candle you blow on, that one and the two candles either side change […]”).

    Isn’t there some sequence of (fewer than 7) blows possible, by which some suitable number of candles (at least 1) would be blown at only once, thus changing from lit to unlit state only once, such that all 7 candles end up unlit eventually ?

  2. Hi Frank

    You’re right that I didn’t technically provide a proof of this! It’s possible to do it in fewer than 7 if you relax the requirement that the three candles blown out each time are three adjacent candles, but with this requirement 7 is the minimum. An idea of the proof is given below.

    The solution which involves blowing on each candle once works regardless of what order the candles are blown on in – since it only matters which candles get blown on and experience an odd number of state changes. 7 is therefore the maximum number of blows you will need, as blowing on the same centre candle twice doesn’t change anything overall, so any valid solution will not involve blowing on any candle more than once (as the centre candle of a set of three).

    Assume that there exists some candle which doesn’t get specifically blown on as a centre candle (and we can choose one arbitrarily, as the problem is symmetrical). This means that of the two candles either side of it, using our assumption that each candle gets blown on at most once, exactly one gets blown on and the other does not (and we can again choose which is which arbitrarily). This means there are two candles together which don’t get blown on (as a centre candle). From here, a chain of similar deductions quickly leads to a contradiction – so our assumption that one candle doesn’t get blown on must have been false.

    I hope that helps!

  3. Katie Steckles wrote (18.12.2019, 12:32 o’clock):
    > […] 7 is therefore the maximum number of blows you will need, as blowing on the same centre candle twice doesn’t change anything overall, so any valid solution will not involve blowing on any candle more than once (as the centre candle of a set of three).

    Agreed.
    (This insight plays a role again below.)

    > Assume that there exists some candle which doesn’t get specifically blown on as a centre candle (and we can choose one arbitrarily, as the problem is symmetrical).

    Okay …

    > This means that of the two candles either side of it, using our assumption that each candle gets blown on at most once,

    Without more detailed proof, this assumption appears too restrictive …

    > exactly one gets blown on and the other does not (and we can again choose which is which arbitrarily). This means there are two candles together which don’t get blown on (as a centre candle). From here, a chain of similar deductions quickly leads to a contradiction – […]

    Well — before I posted my solution (11.12.2019, 13:45 o’clock) I went thinking through the following:

    In order to turn off 7 (an odd number) initially burning trick candles by causing an odd number of state changes to each one requires alltogether an odd number of state changes and therefore an odd number of blows (which each changes the state of three adjacent trick candles). Since one or three blows are “obviously” not sufficient, it remains to rule out turning the trick candles off by 5 suitable blows, corresponding to 15 state changes overall.

    These could be distributed amongst the seven trick candles, giving each an odd number of state changes, either as

    (a): 15 = 9 + (6 * 1), or
    (b): 15 = 7 + 3 + (5 * 1), or
    (c): 15 = 5 + (2 * 3) + 4, or
    (d): 15 = (4 * 3) + (3 * 1).

    To reject (a), (b) as well as (c), note that there are only 5 blows supposed to be given. If all 5 involve one particular trick candle (not necessarily central), then it would change its state 5 times (thus ruling out (a) and (b) right away), while leaving not a single blow to turn off the two furthest (“opposite”) trick candles at all.

    To dismiss (d) consider distributing the 3 trick candles which are supposed to turn their state only once among all 7 on the cake:

    (d1): Selecting 3 among 7 such that neither of the selected 3 are adjacent, makes two pairs “next-to-adjacent”, i.e. each pair “with gap of 1”. Directing blows such that one trick candle “in one such gap” changes state 3 times causes at least one of its (immediate) neighbors to change state at least twice; contrary to the assumption.

    (d2): Therefore at least 2 of the trick candles which are supposed to change their state only once must be adjacent. The 3rd of these 3 would have to be placed “with gap of 2”; otherwise the argument from (d1) applies here directly, too. However: directing blows such that the two trick candles “in the same gap” both change state 3 times causes at least one of the trick candles one the side of the gap to change state at least twice; contrary to the assumption. Consequently:

    (d3): The 3 trick candles which should change state only once would have to be all 3 adjacent. Consequently. the 4 trick candles which each should change their state three times would have to be all 4 adjacent, too. Then either:

    (d31): The 3 adjecent trick candles which should change state only once are blow out with a single blow (directed at the middle). Then the remaining four blows (of five presumed overall) should be affecting exclusively the 4 adjacent trick candles which each should change their state three times. But there are only two distinct “ways to blow” on 4 adjacent trick candles without affecting the other 3 adjacent ones. (Namely two distinct “ways as close as possible to the center”.) Of the remaining four blows to be delivered, then at least two would have to be exact repetitions. Therefore the same result could have been achieved with only three blows alltogether; which however “fails obviously”. Or:

    (d32): Of the 3 adjacent trick candles which should change state only once, both of the outer ones should each receive a blow which doesn’t affect the other two. This leaves the center trick candle yet to change its state. But any blow therefore issued would also turn the state of at least one of its neighbors; contrary to the assumption. This leaves:

    (d33): Of the 3 adjacent trick candles which should change state only once, 2 (including the center one) should be blow on once (without affecting the remaining 1), and the remaining 1 should be blown on once (without affecting the other 2). This also caused 3 of the other 4 to have the state changed once already; and those 3 are not adjacent, leaving 1 “in their gap”.
    With the remaining three blows, this 1 trick candle “in the gap” now should change states three times, without any further affecting any of the 3 adjacent trick candles which should change state only once (while suitably changing the states of the other 3, “around the gap”, if possible). But, again, there are only two distinct “ways to blow” on a gap among 4 adjacent trick candles without affecting the other 3 adjacent ones. Of the remaining three blows to be delivered, then at least two would have to be exact repetitions. Therefore the same result could have been achieved with only three blows alltogether; which however “fails obviously”.

    Consequently, all variants of (d) are rejected; the minimal solution uses at least seven blows and can indeed be achieved as described above (and as already shown 11.12.2019, 13:45 o’clock).

    > I hope that helps!

    Me, too — https://scilogs.spektrum.de/beobachtungen-der-wissenschaft/eine-sternstunde-der-wissenschaft-des-20-jahrhunderts-die-bestaetigung-von-einsteins-allgemeiner-relativitaetstheorie-vor-100-jahren/?unapproved=5233&moderation-hash=e829ba6d106e36be4a404d1ca017e388

    Mayer schrieb (18.12.2019, 00:11 Uhr):
    > Einstein hatte eine “Gedankenstörung” als er Postulierte, dass Ereignisse die in einem System gleichzeitig passieren, in einem anderen System ungleichzeitig passieren können.

    Bei Einstein findet sich u.a. die Formulierung:

    »[…] Wir kommen also zu dem wichtigen Ergebnis:
    Ereignisse, welche in Bezug auf den Bahndamm gleichzeitig sind, sind in Bezug auf den Zug nicht gleichzeitig und umgekehrt (Relativität der Gleichzeitigkeit).«


    Daran ist zu bemerken:

    • Die beschriebene »Relativität der Gleichzeitigkeit« wurde als Ergebnis vorausgehender Definitionen und darauf basierender Gedankenexperimente betrachtet (also offenbar nicht “schlicht von Einstein postuliert”).

    • Einstein behauptet und unterstellt offenbar nicht, dass ein ganzes Ereignis jeweils vollständig in einem [Inertial-]System passieren” würde.

    • Und der Vollständigkeit halber: zur gegebenen Aussage,
    »Ereignisse, welche in Bezug auf den Bahndamm gleichzeitig sind, sind in Bezug auf den Zug nicht gleichzeitig«, lautet eine (formal denkbare) Umkehrung, die zweifellos beabsichtigt ist:
    “Ereignisse, welche in Bezug auf den Zug gleichzeitig sind, sind in Bezug auf den Bahndamm nicht gleichzeitig”.

    Dagegen ist die (ebenfalls formal denkbare) Umkehrung
    “Ereignisse, welche in Bezug auf den Bahndamm nicht gleichzeitig sind, sind in Bezug auf den Zug [stets und zwangsläufig] gleichzeitig”
    zweifellos nicht beabsichtigt.

    Bei allem Wohlwollen kann man an Einsteins Formulierung dennoch Mängel finden:

    (1)
    Die Einschränkung »in Bezug auf«, besonders wenn sie nachgeschoben wird (d.h. “Diese beiden Ereignisse sind gleichzeitig in Bezug auf den Bahndamm.”), erscheint zumindest rhetorisch auffällig: sie hat etwas ans Paradoxe, Irreführende bzw. Paraprosdokische Grenzendes.
    (Ich denke dabei z.B. an “H. Ford: Wir liefern Autos in jeder Lackfarbe — solang sie schwarz ist.” oder “Hägar d. Schr.: Wir Wikinger stellen uns furchtlos jedem Kampf — sofern das Wetter es erlaubt.”)

    (2)
    Die scheinbar unvermeidliche Relativierung (” … aber in Bezug auf den Zug gerade nicht.” usw.) wirkt bestenfalls umständlich und rhetorisch konterkarierend.

    Um eine womöglich weniger störende Formulierung zu finden, sollte und kann der jeweilige Bezug von vornherein und unmittelbar auf die betreffenden Ereignisse angewandt werden:

    Und was ist (bzw.: wie nennt man) “ein bestimmtes Ereignis in Bezug auf ein bestimmtes Inertialsystem oder Bezugssystem”, jeweils an sich, von vornherein, und möglichst kurz und bündig ? —
    Man kann es jeweils “den Anteil eines bestimmten Beteiligten, der zu einem bestimmten Bezugssystem gehört, an diesem Ereignis” nennen;

    denn Bezugssysteme zeichnen sich insbesondere dadurch aus, dass sich die Mitglieder jeweils eines bestimmten Bezugssystems niemals treffen,
    dass also an jedem bestimmten Ereignis höchstens (bzw. genau) nur ein bestimmtes Mitglied eines bestimmten Bezugssystems teilnahm. (Falls an einem bestimmten Ereignis mehrere verschiedene Beteiligte koinzident waren, dann gehörten diese zwangsläufig zu ebenso vielen verschiedenen Bezugssystemen.)

    Oder noch kürzer: man kann schlicht jeweils von “einer bestimmten Anzeige eines bestimmten Beteiligten” sprechen/schreiben.
    (Wobei “eine bestimmte Anzeige eines bestimmten Beteiligten” natürlich nicht mit “Ablesewert/Timestamp/Koordinate, die dieser Anzeige zugeordnet wurde” verwechselt werden darf.)

    “Die Anzeige A_P der Bahnsteig-Einfahrt-Stelle A, dass Zugschluss P passierte, war gleichzeitig zur Anzeige B_Q der Bahnsteig-Ausfahrt-Stelle B, dass Lokomotive Q passierte”.

    (Punkt. Ein relativierendes, konträres “aber” liegt nicht unmittelbar in der Luft. Nach Versuchsanordnung vorausgesetzt ist und bleibt natürlich, dass Bahnsteig-Einfahrt-Stelle A und Bahnsteig-Ausfahrt-Stelle B durchwegs gegenüber einander ruhten und deshalb einen weiteren Beteiligten, M, als “Mitte zwischen” einander identifizieren konnten, der wiederum die beiden Ereignisse ε_AP und ε_BQ zusammen/koinzident wahrnahm.)

    Dazu auch:
    “Die Anzeige P_A des Zugschlusses P, dass die Bahnsteig-Einfahrt-Stelle A passierte, war nicht gleichzeitig zur Anzeige Q_B der Lokomotive Q, dass die Bahnsteig-Ausfahrt-Stelle B passierte”.

    (Punkt. Ein relativierendes, konträres “aber” liegt nicht unmittelbar in der Luft. Nach Versuchsanordnung vorausgesetzt ist und bleibt natürlich, dass Zugschluss P und Lokomotive Q durchwegs gegenüber einander ruhten und deshalb einen weiteren Beteiligten — nennen wir ihn O — als “Mitte zwischen” einander identifizieren konnten, der wiederum die beiden Ereignisse ε_AP und ε_BQ nicht zusammen wahrnahm, sondern zuerst ε_BQ und danach ε_AP.)

    (Übrigens:
    wie oben ausführlich gezeigt, ist unter dieser vorausgesetzten Versuchsanordnung der Zug PQ länger als der Bahnsteig AB,
    nämlich (AB / PQ ) = √{ 1 – β^2 }.
    Und der oben gelegentlich erwähnte Beteiligte N ist natürlich als “Mitte zwischen” K und Q identifiziert;
    nicht etwa als “Mitte zwischen” P und Q.)

    > Wenn zwei Objekte gleich lang sind

    … also zwangsläufig nicht die selben zwei Objekte — Zug und Bahnsteig — wie in der oben beschrieben Versuchsanordnung …

    > und sich [jedes der beiden Enden des einen jedes der beiden Enden des anderen genau/nur ein mal treffen/passieren]

    … sich die beiden also womöglich “geradlinig einander entlang” bewegten, und womöglich auch gleichförmig gegenüber einander, mit konstantem Geschwindigkeits-Betrag “β c” …

    > und wenn zwei Blitze an beiden Enden der Objekte gleichzeitig einschlagen dann

    … dann wäre “gleichzeitig” dabei offenbar nicht im Sinne der Einsteinschen Definition von “gleichzeitig” (1916/17; s. URL im Kommentar-Memo.) gemeint.

    Gemeint wäre womöglich stattdessen, dass zu zwei bestimmten der insgesamt vier Treff/Passage/Koinzidenz-Ereignisse die beteiligten Enden jeweils auch das Einschlagen eines Blitzes koinzident wahrnahmen.
    Und falls so — dann:
    ist keine Anzeige eines der “Objekt”-Enden, die an einem der beiden Treff/Passage/Koinzidenz/Blitz-Ereignisse teilnahmen, gleichzeitig zur Anzeige eines der “Objekt”-Enden, die an dem anderen der beiden Treff/Passage/Koinzidenz/Blitz-Ereignisse teilnahmen.

    (Es ließe sich aber noch ein anderes, ebenfalls aus mindestens zwei gegenüber einander ruhenden Enden bestehendes “Objekt” in Betracht ziehen, das sich symmetrisch gegenüber beiden der erstgenannten “Objekte” jeweils mit Geschwindigkeits-Betrag “(1/β - √{ 1/β^2 - 1 }) c” “geradlinig einander entlang” bewegte,
    und dessen beide Enden ebenfalls jeweils an einem der beiden beschriebenen Treff/Passage/Koinzidenz/Blitz-Ereignisse teilnahmen.
    Dieses dritte, “symmetrisch bewegte Objekt” wäre allerdings zwangsläufig kürzer als die beiden erstgenannten; und zwar kürzer um einen Faktor, der kleiner als 1 aber größer als √{ 1 - β^2 } ist. …)

Leave a Reply


E-Mail-Benachrichtigung bei weiteren Kommentaren.
-- Auch möglich: Abo ohne Kommentar. +