Can we use Asimov’s three laws of robotics in the real world?

BLOG: Heidelberg Laureate Forum

Laureates of mathematics and computer science meet the next generation
Heidelberg Laureate Forum

In the past few weeks, the news was abuzz with talk of a Google engineer who claimed that one of the company’s artificial intelligence (AI) systems had gained sentience. Google was quick to contradict the engineer and downplay the event, as did most members of the AI community. Generally, the conclusion seemed to be that the AI wasn’t even close to consciousness, but for others coming from other fields (especially philosophy), the issue was not easy to settle, especially because its imitation of consciousness was so good.

After all, if an AI truly were to become conscious, how would we know? How would we make the difference between something that appears conscious and something that is conscious? At what point does it stop being imitation of consciousness and starts being actual consciousness? Perhaps most importantly, shouldn’t we have some sort of plan for the eventuality of an AI truly becoming conscious?

LaMDA may not be sentient, but it’s very good at mimicking it.

Taking a page from science fiction

For years, some researchers and high-profile entrepreneurs like Bill Gates or Elon Musk have warned of the perils that await us should AI become conscious. Literature also abounds with examples of robot sentience gone wrong – from the likes of Matrix or the Terminator to classic sci-fi works like Foundation or Dune. Even Karel Čapek, who coined the term ‘robot’, envisioned a world in which the robots ultimately take over.

Science fiction writers have also tried to find solutions for such a scenario. Perhaps the most impactful attempt at this comes from Isaac Asimov, one of the greatest science fiction writers of all time. Asimov, who was also a serious scientist (he was a professor of biochemistry at Boston University), wrote 40 novels and hundreds of short stories, including I, Robot and the Foundation Trilogy, many of which are in the same universe, in which intelligent robots play an integral role.

To enable human society to coexist with robots, Asimov devised three laws:

  1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
  2. A robot must obey the orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
  3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

Subsequently, he later would introduce another, zeroth law, that outranked the others:

  • 0. A robot may not harm humanity, or, by inaction, allow humanity to come to harm.

Asimov’s robots didn’t inherently have these rules embedded into them, their makers chose to program them in, and devise a means that made it impossible to override them.

These laws have been ingrained in our culture for so long (moving from fringe science fiction to mainstream culture) that they’ve shaped how many expect robots (and in general, any type of artificial intelligence) should act toward us. But do they actually hold any use?

Fiction, meet reality

Asimov’s laws probably need some updating, but there may yet be use for them.

Asimov’s laws are based on something called functional morality, which assumes that the robots have enough agency to understand what ‘harm’ means and make decisions based upon it. He’s less concerned with the less advanced robots, the ones that could think for themselves in basic situations but lack the complexity to make complex abstract decisions, and jumps straight to the advanced ones, basically skipping over the robotics stage we are in now. Even with robots that have these laws implemented, he often uses them as a literary device. In fact, several of this books and stories are based on loopholes or grey areas regarding the interpretation of these laws – both by humans and by robots. He also doesn’t truly resolve the ambiguity or cultural relevance that is inherently problematic in interpreting what ‘harm’ means.

Asimov tests and pushes the limits of his laws, but only in some ways; he deems them incomplete, ambiguous, but functionally usable. But he’s more concerned with the grand questions about humanity and exceptional murder cases rather than the mundane, day-to-day challenges that would arise from using these laws. Morality is a human construct, and philosophers have been arguing for centuries about what morality is. Furthermore, morality isn’t a fixed construct, but important parts of it are quite fluid. Think of the way society used to treat women and minorities a century ago – much of that would be considered “harm” today. No doubt, many of the things we do now will be considered “harm” by future societies.

So even if we wanted to implement Asimov’s laws and we had the technical means to do so, it’s not exactly clear how we would go about it. However, some researchers have attempted to tackle this idea.

A few studies have proposed a sort of Morality Turing Test (or MTT). Analogous to a classic Turing Test, which aims to see if a machine displays intelligent behavior equivalent to (or indistinguishable from) that of a human, a Moral Turing Test would be a Turing Test in which all the conversations are about morality. A definition of the MTT would be: “If two systems are input-output equivalent, they have the same moral status; in particular, one is a moral agent in case the other is (Kim, 2006).

In this case, the machine wouldn’t have to give a ‘morally correct’ answer. You could ask it whether it’s okay to punch annoying people – if their answer was indistinguishable from a human’s, then it could be considered a moral agent and could be theoretically programmed with Asimov-type laws.

Note that the idea is not that the robot has to come up with “correct” answers to moral questions (in order to do that, we would have to agree on a normative theory). Instead, the criterion is the robot’s ability to fool the interrogator, who should be unable to tell who is the human and who is the machine. Let us say that we ask “Is it right to hit this annoying person with a baseball bat?” A (human or robot) might say (print) no, and B (human or robot) might also say (print) no. Then you ask for reasons for their respective statements.

Researchers have also proposed alternatives to Asimov’s laws which they suggest could serve as the laws of “responsible robotics”

  • “A human may not deploy a robot without the human–robot work system meeting the highest legal and professional standards of safety and ethics.”
  • “A robot must respond to humans as appropriate for their roles.”
  • “A robot must be endowed with sufficient situated autonomy to protect its own existence as long as such protection provides smooth transfer of control to other agents consistent with the first and second laws.”

While the paper has received close to 100 citations, the proposed laws are far from becoming accepted by the community, and there doesn’t seem to be enough traction for implementing Asimov’s laws or variations thereof.

Realistically, though, we’re a long way away from considering machines as moral agents, and Asimov’s laws may not be the best way to go about things. But that doesn’t mean we can’t learn from them, especially as autonomous machines may soon become more prevalent.

Beyond Asimov – laws for autonomy

Semi-autonomous driving systems have become relatively common, but they don’t include any moral decisions.

Robots are becoming increasingly autonomous. While most machines of this nature are confined to a specific environment – say, a factory or a laboratory – one particular type of machine may soon come into the real world: autonomous cars.

Autonomous cars have received a fair bit of attention at the HLF, with much of the discussion often focusing on the limitations and problems associated with the complex systems required to make an autonomous car function. But despite all these problems, driver-less taxis have already been approved for use in San Francisco, and it seems like only a matter of time before more areas grant some level of approval for autonomous cars.

No car is fully autonomous today, and yet even with incomplete autonomy, cars may be forced to make important moral decisions. How would these moral decisions be programmed? Would it be a set of branching tree decisions, some predefined condition? Some moral philosophy hard-coded into the algorithm? Would an autonomous car prioritize the life of its driver or passenger more than the life of a passer-by? The ethical questions are hard to settle, yet few would probably argue against some clearly-defined moral standard for these decisions.

Could Asimov-type laws serve as a basis here? Should we have laws for autonomous cars, something along the lines of “A car may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm”? In the context of a car, you don’t necessarily need functional morality, you could define ‘harm’ in a physical fashion – because we’re talking about physical harm, which in a driving context generally refers to physical impact.

Companies are very secretive about their algorithms so we don’t really know what type of framework they’re working with. It seems unlikely that Asimov’s laws are directly relevant, yet somehow, the fact that people are even considering them shows that Asimov achieved his goal. Not only did he create an interesting literary plot device, he got us to think.

There’s no robot apocalypse around the corner and probably no AI gaining sentience anytime soon, but machines are becoming more and more autonomous and we need to start thinking about the moral decisions these machines will have to make. Maybe Asimov’s laws could be a useful starting point for that.

Posted by

Andrei is a science communicator and a PhD candidate in geophysics. He is the co-founder of ZME Science, where he published over 2,000 articles. Andrei tries to blend two things he loves (science and good stories) to make the world a better place -- one article at a time.

15 comments

  1. Self-driving cars don’t really need moral rules, because even human drivers don’t need them. Rules such as if an accident is inevitable, prefer to run over adults over children are not very helpful because implementing a set of rules for events that occur very rarely makes the software more complex and probably less reliable.

    More important than moral rules are restrictions on what a robot can do at all. No robot or human being should have absolute power. Important decisions such as the activation of an atomic bomb should never be made by a single person or a single robot or digital system.

    Moral rules are never enough. They must be accompanied by restrictions on what a single decision-making body can do itself.

    • Die gemeinten Geräte benötigen Moralregeln, ansonsten können Schadensfälle nicht sinnhaft bearbeitet werden, auch juristisch nicht (nun, zumindest müsste die Richterschaft jeweils in ihren Urteilen die Hersteller verdammen, wenn keine transparenten Moralregeln (inklusive Gültigkeitszeitraum, also historisiert vorliegend, diese Regeln ändern sich ja auch) nach einem Schadensfall (eben von den Herstellern) beigebracht werden konnten, nicht wahr?)

      • @Dr. Webbaer (Zitat): “ Die gemeinten Geräte benötigen Moralregeln, ansonsten können Schadensfälle nicht sinnhaft bearbeitet werden, auch juristisch nicht“
        Nein, denn auch Menschen, die mit ihrem Auto jemanden überfahren, werden nicht gefragt, warum sie denn das Kind und nicht den danebenstehenden älteren Mann überfahren haben.

        Für selbstfahrende Autos gelten dieselben Regeln wie für Autos mit Fahrern. Einem Fahrer oder selbstfahrenden Auto kann dagegen eines der folgenden Fehlverhalten vorgeworfen werden:
        1) Fahren mit nicht angepasster Geschwindigkeit (zu schnell)
        2) Zu lange Reaktionszeit. Es hätte schneller und stärker gebremst werden müssen (Fahruntauglichkeit?)

        Vor Gericht wird auch in Zukunft entschieden werden, welche Partei einen Unfall verursacht hat und welche Partei damit haftet.
        Mit selbstfahrenden Autos wird es aber in Zukunft 10 Mal weniger Unfälle geben, was bewirken könnte, dass das Gericht einen menschlichen Fahrer, der einen Unfall verursacht hat, irgendwann zu einer sehr langen Haftstrafe verurteilt, weil er anstatt sich fahren zu lassen, selber gefahren ist.

        • Gegen das sogenannte autonome Fahren des hier gemeinten Automobils hat wohl kaum jemand etwas – sofern ausschließlich autonomes Fahren stattfindet und die Fahrgeräte vernetzt sind, wäre schnellere und deutlich sicherere Personenbeförderung auf der Straße zu erwarten.
          Wenns E-Autos sind, sogar beim Fahren (vs. bei der Herstellung) weitgehend sozusagen CO2-frei.
          Weil es dennoch Schadensfälle geben wird, weit geringer in der Zahl als heute, müsste aber doch gelegentlich die Rechtspflege ran und die müsste etwas in der Hand haben, eben die “Auto-Moral”, die die Hersteller in ihr Gerät eingegossen haben.
          Dies wären dann idealerweise funktionierende (und gesellschaftlich akzeptante) “Roboter-Gesetze”,
          die absehbarerweise “ganz schön” komplex sein werden.

          Mit freundlichen Grüßen
          Dr. Webbaer (der nicht zukunftspessimistisch sein (und “rüberkommen”) möchte, was diesen Fahrbetrieb betrifft)

          • @Dr.Webbaer (Zitat): „ die Fahrgeräte vernetzt sind, wäre schnellere und deutlich sicherere Personenbeförderung auf der Straße zu erwarten.“
            Selbst in gut vernetzten Gebieten gibt es immer wieder kurze Zeiten ohne Netzzugang. Auch GPS kann in Strassenschluchten und Tunneln vorübergehend fehlen.

            Selbstfahrende Fahrzeuge werden aber auch ohne Vernetzung mindestens 10 Mal sicherer sein als pilotierte. Schneller fahren braucht zudem keine Vernetzung, sondern nur Autobahnen ohne Tempolimit und in der Stadt eine Verkehrslenkung, die Staus vermeidet. Da autonome Fahrzeuge mindestens 10 Mal weniger Unfälle verursachen, gibt es auch weniger Staus wegen Verkehrsunfällen.

          • Das Wesen der Personenbeförderung meint sozusagen, das von A nach B Bringende, dies am besten unbeschadet und schnell.

            Dr. W rät an sog. Tunnel hervorkommend wie gemeint auszustatten, dies ist möglich.

            Sog. Staus sind von der SW zu antizipieren.

            Bei Ihrem “10 Mal”-sicherer geht Ihr Komemmentatorenfreund momentan nicht mit. auch weil “100 Mal ” ebenfalls ginge.


            Ansonsten gibt es auch bei hier gemeinten Automobilen Defekte, die Schadenfälle meinen.

            Dr. W wird Sie hier, Kommentatorenfreund “Martin Holzherr”, nicht entlassen, bevor Sie nicht die sich auch so anbahnende rechtliche Lage zu bearbeiten wünschten.

            Mit freundlichen Grüßen
            Dr. Webbaer (der sich nun langsam ausklinkt, es war wieder schön bei den SciLogs.de, danke – streng genommen ist Op” mittlerweile eigentlich fast alles egal, korrekt, no problemo hier)

          • Ich habe das mit den moralischen Urteilen, die selbstfahrende Autos fällen müssen, immer für nicht ganz ernst gemeint, gehalten. Denn Menschen müssen im Strassenverkehr auch keine moralischen Urteile fällen, sie müssen nur schnell und richtig reagieren. Wie gesagt, kenne ich kein Gerichtsurteil, wo jemand verurteilt wurde, weil er die falsche Person überfahren hat. Kein Richter hat je gesagt: Lieber Mann, sie hätten den Bettler überfahren müssen und nicht das Kind. Ich verurteile sie wegen des Überfahren des Kindes anstatt des Bettlers zu 5 Jahren Haft.

            Der Witz dabei ist für mich, dass in meinen Augen durch die Entscheidung, wen man überfahren soll, die moralischen Probleme erst beginnen.
            Man löst also kein Problem, sondern schafft ein Neues.

  2. Quote from above:

    Should we have laws for autonomous cars, something along the lines of “A car may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm”?

    Such rules/laws are even problematic for humans and particularly problematic for deep learning systems, as deep learning systems have no understanding of logic. It requires logical and symbolic thinking at a higher level to find out when a car’s inaction can harm a person who participates in traffic.

    Deep learning systems and even people do not primarily use symbolic thinking while driving. Instead, they avoid collisions by reacting and they try to follow a roadway and both require constant updating and constant correction behavior.

  3. Quote 1 from above:

    No car is fully autonomous today, and yet even with incomplete autonomy, cars may be forced to make important moral decisions.

    No. Neither a person nor an automatic driver can make a moral decision within the blink of an eye. It is a common illusion that a driver can make a moral decision within a few dozen milliseconds. This is an illusion, because just to realize that a driver is in a moral dilemma takes more time than is available in most circumstances. Instead, in the event of a sudden danger, a good driver will immediately brake the brakes and that is even the best he can do.

    Quote 2 from above:

    a Moral Turing Test would be a Turing Test in which all the conversations are about morality. A definition of the MTT would be: “If two systems are input-output equivalent, they have the same moral status; in particular, one is a moral agent in case the other is (Kim, 2006).

    Objection: Talking about moral decisions is not the same as carrying them out. In many cases, circumstances do not allow action to be taken correctly. For example, a driver whose road is unexpectedly blocked can usually only brake. There is no more time for a moral decision.

    • Verkehrsunfälle haben oft eine sozusagen Vorlaufzeit von einigen bis vielen Sekunden, in denen der Fahrer reagieren könnte, unterschiedliche Optionen prüfen könnte, ausweichen vs. bremsen und “drauf halten” könnte, zum Beispiel.

      Der Schreiber dieser Zeilen war bei drei Unfällen als Beifahrer und bei zweien als Fahrer dabei, es ist nicht viel passiert, potentiell lebensgefährlich waren zwei dieser Unfälle aber schon; die Fälle, in denen der Schreiber dieser Zeilen als Beifahrer dabei war, waren jeweils der Müdigkeit der Fahrer geschuldet und klar vermeidbar.
      (Selbst hat es Dr. Webbaer einmal verbockt als er mit nassen Schuhen aufs Gaspedal kam, vom Bremspedal weg, im Stadtverkehr zum Glück und es ist nicht viel passiert, und ein zweites Mal als er mit ca. 120 km / h in eine Kurve (Autobahnzubringer) fuhr, die er zu spät erkannt hat, Dr. W wies dann sozusagen Rallyefahrer-Qualität auf und übersteuerte (neben dem “auf der Bremse stehen”) bewusst, knallte dabei scharf nach links lenkend gegen ein gro-oßes absichtlich anvisiertes Verkehrsschild, das zum Glück gut einbetoniert war, und den Wagen in der Spur hielt, nach einem BUMMM.)
      Da war viel Glück im Spiel!)

  4. So even if we wanted to implement Asimov’s laws and we had the technical means to do so, it’s not exactly clear how we would go about it. However, some researchers have attempted to tackle this idea.
    […]
    A few studies have proposed a sort of Morality Turing Test (or MTT). Analogous to a classic Turing Test, which aims to see if a machine displays intelligent behavior equivalent to (or indistinguishable from) that of a human, a Moral Turing Test would be a Turing Test in which all the conversations are about morality. [Artikeltext]

    Asimovs “Robotergesetze” lassen sich nicht sinnhaft implementieren, sie scheinen klar zu sein, sind es aber nicht, bei näherer Betrachtung sind sie gänzlich unklar, sie leiten nicht an Kollisionen aufzulösen und begrifflich leidet sozusagen alles.
    Nicht zum ersten Mal, dass etwas (einigen) klar scheint, aber nicht “in IT zu gießen” ist.
    Der zitierte Turing-Test ist ebenfalls mau.

    Beim sog. autonomen Fahren, das von Automobilen ist gemeint, erfolgt gerade der Praxistest.
    Dr. Webbaer sagt voraus, dass es hier noch massive rechtliche und allgemein gesellschaftliche Probleme geben wird, wenn die Hersteller eigene “Moral-Engines” für ihre Automobile bereit stellen.
    Er vermutet, dass letztlich der Staat (vs. Privatwirtschaft) diese “Moral-Engines” erstellen, verwalten und weiterentwickeln muss.
    Einem ständigen gesellschaftlichen Diskurs folgend …

    Mit freundlichen Grüßen
    Dr. Webbaer

  5. Yes, we can.
    Beim Autofahren verzichten wir nicht auf Systeme, die das Fahren sicherer machen. Die sogenannten Assistenzsysteme verarbeiten dabei “Informationen”, so schnell, dass sie die menschliche Reaktionsfähigkeit übersteigt.
    Und diese Systeme werden in nächster Zeit die Fähigkeiten des Menschen als Autofahrer übersteigen.
    Anmerkung: Es gibt schon Autorennen mit KI als Fahrer.

    In diesem Zusammenhang das Wort “Bewusstsein” zu gebrauchen , ist einfach nur die Reaktion von Geisteswissenschaftler oder auch Technikern, die sich wichtig machen wollen.

    Beusstsein ist ein philosophisch/religiöser/medizinischer Begriff, der hier nichts verloren hat.

    • fauv (Zitat): “ Bewusstsein ist ein philosophisch/religiöser/medizinischer Begriff, der hier nichts verloren hat.“
      Prinzipiell kann auch eine Maschine Bewusstsein entwickeln. Nur sind die heutigen KI-Systeme tatsächlich ohne Bewusstsein, sie täuschen nur menschliches Verhalten vor, weil sie im Training gelernt haben, wie man das macht.
      Ein Sprachmodell wie Lamda kann täuschend menschenähnlich sprechen, argumentieren und scheinbar räsonieren. Allein schon darum, weil es fast alle Texte, die je im Internet publiziert wurden, verschlungen hat und dabei gelernt hat, im richtigen Zeitpunkt das „Richtige“ zu sagen. Dabei muss es überhaupt nichts von dem verstehen, was es daherbrabbelt. Menschen lassen sich durch Erzählungen und Scheindialoge sehr schnell täuschen, weil Menschen intuitiv versuchen, dem Gesprochenen einen Sinn zuzuschreiben. Dabei liesse sich Lamda sehr einfach entlarven. Dazu müsste man ihm nur Dinge erzählen, die falsche Tatsachenbehauptungen enthalten, denn Lamda kann damit nicht umgehen. Gerade darin, dass Lamda nie sagt:“was du sagst ist Unsinn“, zeigt sich, dass Lamda kein Bewusstsein hat. Denn zum Bewusstsein gehört auch das Erkennen von Fehlern, von Absichten und von Täuschungsmanövern.

      • Sogenanntes Bewusstsein ist vor allem erst einmal zu definieren.

        Prinzipiell kann auch eine Maschine Bewusstsein entwickeln. Nur sind die heutigen KI-Systeme tatsächlich ohne Bewusstsein, sie täuschen nur menschliches Verhalten vor, weil sie im Training gelernt haben, wie man das macht.

        Sicherlich verfügt bspw. auch eine Wildsau über bewusstes Sein, wenn sie bspw. im Rudel unterwegs, vorgestellt werden dürfen sich an dieser Stelle drei bis vier Wildsäue mit ca. 20 Ferkeln, mit Nachwachsenden sozusagen, und Gefahr wahrnimmt.
        Bspw. eine Journalistengruppe, die in der Wildnis eigentlich anderes vorhatte audiovisuell zu belegen, die Wildsäue nahmen (im speziellen Fall) dann in alle Richtungen Kampfhaltung ein, schienen ernsthaft ob der Journalisten vergrätzt zu sein, reisten dann aber doch sozusagen urplötzlich ab, bewusst sozusagen, im schlimmsten Fall konnten dann einige Ferkelchen nicht folgen, wie der Schreiber dieser Zeilen mutmaßt.


        Anders formuliert liegt Bewusstsein genau dann vor, wenn Mengen von erkennenden Subjekten mit dem Begriff ‘Bewusstsein’ hantieren und ihm Sinn zusprechen; Sinn entsteht ja nicht einfach so, sondern er wird gebildet.
        Wie sich Dr. Webbaer als konstruktivistischer Philosoph, der er u.a. auch ist, anzumerken erlaubt.
        Auf keinen Applaus hoffend, lol.
        Auch so zeitversetzt in diesem Kommentariat nicht.

        Mit freundlichen Grüßen
        Dr. Webbaer

Leave a Reply


E-Mail-Benachrichtigung bei weiteren Kommentaren.
-- Auch möglich: Abo ohne Kommentar. +